6 posts categorized "Regenerative medicine"

May 16, 2012

We've got a new niche!

SignalsThe SCN Blog has a new name and a new home: http://www.signalsblog.ca

After nearly four years and 207 blog posts, we finally outgrew our dish, so to speak. Late last year, we began planning with the newly-formed Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine, who indicated an interest to begin blogging in the sphere. (Perhaps you'll recall our name contest?) Why have two blogs competing when one can do the job? The result is Signals Blog (the new name came from an SCN staff member who sadly was not eligible for a prize), which will continue to bring the same level of insight, commentary and research news you've found on the SCN Blog, but will add new perspectives and news on biomaterials, regenerative medicine and commercialization.

We think it's a great partnership that will provide a more comprehensive view of the world of stem cells and regenerative medicine. 

To ease the transition for readers, all archived posts from the SCN Blog have been moved to their new home and RSS feeds will be updated to the new address. Comments will be closed on this site, but we'll keep a copy of the archives here for the short term. 

This is our final post on this site: please update your links and check out our new niche at www.signalsblog.ca!

May 04, 2012

View from the floor 4: Risk aversion in cell therapy development

This content has moved!

To read this article, please visit Signals BlogView from the floor 4: Risk aversion in cell therapy development

May 01, 2012

View from the floor 2: Till & McCulloch Meetings

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To read this article, please visit Signals BlogView from the floor 2: Till & McCulloch Meetings 

View from the floor 1: Till & McCulloch Meetings

This content has moved!

To read this article, please visit Signals BlogView from the floor 1: Till & McCulloch Meetings

March 21, 2012

Using titanium to induce bone differentiation and personalized implants

by Angela C.H. McDonald

Titanium can be found everywhere. It is used in cars, sporting equipment and even jewelry manufacturing. But did you know that titanium products are used inside the human body?

You may know someone who has undergone a joint replacement procedure or someone who has a dental implant. For decades, titanium alloys have been used as a biomaterial for these applications.

Titanium is a biocompatible material, which means that it is able to integrate into the body without being rejected. This is a major reason why titanium biomaterials are so popular in orthopedics and dentistry. However, the ability of a titanium implant to fuse with surrounding bone tissue inside the body (a property known as osseointegration) needs to be improved.

Continue reading "Using titanium to induce bone differentiation and personalized implants" »

March 13, 2012

The evolution of biomaterials

by Roshan Yoganathan

Prosthetic_footI’ve been working in the field of biomaterials for over five years now. A short period of time, but nevertheless I’ve noticed that the field has evolved considerably. Since the inception of “biologically compatible materials,” their capabilities, functionalities and uses have undergone multiple stages of change.

There are distinct turning points when biomaterial research is thought to have evolved. I believe we are currently in the third generation and slowly shifting to the fourth (more on this later).

So here is how I see it, starting from the beginning.

Continue reading "The evolution of biomaterials" »